Aurora - Short Story

Need to get something off of (or onto) your chest? Set it free!
Hey everyone!

I keep writing stuff and I began to translate one of my short stories. I'm trying a new way to present things, so feel free to read it and let me know if you like the presentation system.

https://sway.com/FVnJh4tPS7i2cIxs

More to come if you like this one.

Spoiler Alert !
She does not die

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Posts: 1831
Location: Bordeaux, France

Yay, I bet she's hot. Do you have also PDF? I'd like to store it.

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Posts: 465
Location: Brno, Czech Republic

There will be a PDF but once the thing is finished (translation-speaking) :)

Plus I'm still unsure about the policy I should adopt about my writings.
I like this one so I may put a Creative Commons or else to protect the thing. Still have to investigate.

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Posts: 1831
Location: Bordeaux, France

@Ulnarevern The most important thing to remember when choosing a licensing method is that you can never make it MORE restrictive. In the U.S. (and I think most other countries) things you create are considered copyrighted by default unless you specify otherwise (or unless you are implicitly assigning a different license type because of where you made your creation public). When you post something to our forums, for example, you retain all rights to it (meaning it can still be copyrighted) except that you give us a NON-EXCLUSIVE license to store and redistribute that content. You have to grant us that right in order for us to be able to host your content on our forums.

Other services may try to make greater claims on your intellectual property, so be REALLY CAREFUL about posting your intellectual property on services you don't personally own. Always read the Terms to make sure you understand what content rights you are giving up when you use a service!

That said, I suggest using Copyright as your license and then specifying specific licensing where appropriate. Creative Commons is great, but is designed for very general licensing, which might not be restrictive enough if you want to make money off of your work in the future.

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Posts: 1722
Location: Dallas, TX USA

Well, that was really really enlightening!

I must assume that, for now, I haven't really searched about all this (mostly because what I put here is not a complete story). But for further use, this will be really helpful!

THANKS A LOT @bscotchAdam!

By the way, the French law is apparently nicer on this point (you're automatically the owner of your stuff, but you need a proof that you've made it) but I believe that your forums only belong to the U.S. laws

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Posts: 1831
Location: Bordeaux, France

Yeah, US law changed pretty recently to be more in line with European copyright laws. It used to be that you had to declare copyright (or other licensing) or else things you made were public domain by default. Now the moment you create something it IS COPYRIGHTED BY DEFAULT. Because U.S. and European laws are quite similar, you don't have to worry too much about international issues.

People in the US are mistakenly under the impression that you don't own the copyright on your work until you get official documentation of that copyright. This is NOT TRUE. The only reason to get an official copyright is to prove ownership in the case of lawsuits (though it's not required for that purpose either). In general, you don't need to prove original ownership to have copyright on your work (again, that copyright exists the moment the work is created, by default, unless you explicitly change the terms) but you may need to prove that you are the creator in the case you have to DEFEND your work against someone who is infringing it. I'm not sure how specific that is to the US, but I think its pretty similar in most of Europe.

Note that other forms of intellectual property (e.g. trademarks and patents) are nothing like copyright. They do require official legal documentation and are not granted by default.

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Posts: 1722
Location: Dallas, TX USA

This is complicated. Why can't people just be honest?
Thanks for the details :)

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Posts: 1831
Location: Bordeaux, France

Because there are A LOT OF JERKS out there!

I had to get familiar with U.S. intellectual property (IP) law because of my grad school work. The standard model for publishing scientific work is that the scientist gets funding from tax payers, designs and runs experiments using that funding, writes up the results, and then sends that paper off to a journal. The journal, if it accepts your paper, tries to claim all IP rights to its content! Most scientists don't even realize this, and just sign the stuff. The journal then retains copyright on the paper and even the scientist isn't allowed, legally, to share that scientific work publicly with the very people who paid for it (taxpayers!). The problem extends to patents over discoveries made by academic labs, and blah blah blah.

You'll face similar problems in publishing literature. You always have to give up some subset of your IP rights when you find a publisher. Since most people don't understand the topic at all, the publisher just goes ahead and has you sign away all of your rights unless you have a lawyer or knowledgable agent on hand that can help you negotiate.

It's amazing how much human effort is wasted in dealing with or preventing the jerk behavior of other humans. About half of the development time for the BscotchID side of things is dedicated to security of our web systems, since we know that, without a doubt, people will try to hack us. One of the big reasons we haven't made a real multiplayer game yet is that we know it, too, will get extensively hacked, and we have to figure out how to deal with that. If only everyone would just play by the damn rules!

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Posts: 1722
Location: Dallas, TX USA


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