How to give good game dev feedback

Talk about anything and everything game dev-related here!
Be specific
Games are crazy beasts with hundreds or thousands of inter-dependent parts. With this many parts working together, it is necessarily true that the developers cannot possibly have envisioned every scenario. Therefore your feedback needs to be specific enough that the developer can either reproduce what you saw or reason through why you saw it. For example, include details like what buttons you pressed right before something happened, where you were in the game world, what other things were also present, how long between when you did something and when you got that result, and so on. The more information you give, the more that can be done with it!

Aside from obvious problems like bugs, you may also have thoughts on the feel of the game. It's much harder to be specific about feelings, but do your best and explain why you think you feel that way.

Be concise
Developers are busy. We're always juggling a hundred bugfixes while simultaneously trying to move the game forward. So while we need to know about all of the problems, and need to know all relevant information to understand those problems, any extraneous information will slow down development. You don't have to be polite, with long-winded poetic sentences.

So instead of: "Yo, I was, like, diving way down in the deeps and then HOLY CRAP I got this awesome HAMMER but I wasn't sure if I wanted it. I switched anyway, 'cuz, you know, Hammers, amiright? So anyway, I was fighting Pete and then, WHAM, I killed him but then Tak disappeared and I was all WHAAAAT!??"

Say something like: "Tak disappeared when Pete killed with Hammer."

Try to break it
As a developer, you'll know exactly how to play your game. But your players won't, and they will do things you didn't plan for. When helping with testing a game, then, try to find the limits of what the game allows. More importantly, try to get past the limits. If you can make the game break, another player can too, and that other player will be a jerk and drop a 1-star review on Google Play. The developers will want to fix that problem before it goes live.

Provide solutions
While you may not be a developer, providing a solution with a problem you've identified will make your feedback better. Your solution might not work, but coming up with one will force you to more carefully state the problem, and will help to clear up confusion when we try to understand what the problem was.

Break up your observations into categories
A list of precise observations is much more useful than one long observation that takes into account multiple systems. Using categories helps you to notice things in the first place, and also makes your feedback much more precise and helpful. Example categories include:
User interface: Menus, heads-up-displays (HUDS), on-screen buttons, and the like. Could you navigate them? Were they nice looking?Animation: For each character, does the animation seem smooth? Did they do things that seemed unnatural (when they shouldn't have)?Art: Were the art styles consistent for different in-game items? Were there any art assets that you particularly do or do not like?
Juice: "Juice" refers to any aspect of the game that is purely for show but that makes it feel really good. What felt good about the game? What didn't? Is there some game aspect that needs juice?Mechanics: "Mechanics" are how you interact with the game. In fact they are the game. Do you get results that make sense when you click/tap things? Did you have trouble figuring out what to do? Did you think you understood something only to have it do something unexpected?Audio: How are the sound effects and music? Are they too loud/soft? How are transitions between musical pieces? Do in-game objects and creatures make reasonable sounds?
Bugs: Anything that seems broken. A subset of all other categories.
Balance: Is the game too hard or slow? Too easy or fast? Did you get bored? Is there enough to do?
This stuff is super important if you are developing a game (with a team
or by yourself), or if you are alpha/beta testing a game for another
group (like us!). Add your thoughts in the
comments!

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Posts: 1722
Location: Dallas, TX USA

Super helpful and hilarious example sentence. My wife looked at me like I was crazy laughing out of nowhere.

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Posts: 20
Location: illinois, usa

I will keep all of these in mind while playing. Downloading it now. :)

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Posts: 31

Question: obviously you want bug reports when they happen. You asking for feedback along the way or just at the end of the 10 days?

Or should we look at maybe a report every 3 days (or less? ) on our general feeling of things?

Want to give you good information without overloading y'all.

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Posts: 939
Location: #1 Australian Fan

Any time you think there's something we should know, just hit the "Feedback" button we've placed in the bottom-right corner and send it our way! No worries about overloading us, so long as it's all useful!

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Posts: 1371
Location: St. Louis, Missouri, USA

You should see the list of issues we give to Seth EVERY SINGLE MORNING.

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Posts: 1722
Location: Dallas, TX USA

Does it include problems like "you smell funny" or is it actual game related bugs?

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Posts: 939
Location: #1 Australian Fan

Hey dudes!

EDIT:
I made a new discussion for a bug I found before logging in. I wanted to keep it more organized, so I took it out of here and added it in the bugs forum.

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Posts: 31

Ack! As long as you made it in. The login is a bit temporary, as it will change a lot with the full Bscotch ID implementation. You can post this kind of stuff in the new thread Alpha feedback!

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Posts: 1722
Location: Dallas, TX USA

I think I missed signing up for the alpha, is there still a chance to help out or no? I can use the above guidelines to help make the game better

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Posts: 126

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